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A tale with two endings

When it rains, it pours. This is unfortunately the case for a lot of things in life, and equine botulism is no exception. A recent article in The Fence Post relays the danger of the disease spreading quickly after one horse is infected.

The article follows the Continue reading A tale with two endings

Combating equine botulism myths – Part five

Editor’s note: When it comes to equine botulism, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. In our latest series, we hope to tackle some common misconceptions about the disease. For our first post on a myth surrounding the geographic location of botulism, click here. For our second post on round bales, click here, for our third post on prevalence, click here, and for the fourth post on hay bales and rodents, click here.

Myth: If a horse acquires botulism, human negligence was involved.

Reality: Unfortunately, the stigma often attached to equine botulism is a vicious circle. It’s important to keep in mind that botulism is considered a silent killer because it can often cause the death of an animal with no warning at all. At the same time, many people don’t want to discuss equine botulism because of the perception that it is related to poor husbandry. Continue reading Combating equine botulism myths – Part five

Combating equine botulism myths – Part four

Editor’s note: When it comes to equine botulism, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. In our latest series, we hope to tackle some common misconceptions about the disease. For our first post on a myth surrounding the geographic location of botulism, click here. For our second post on round bales, click here, and for our third post on prevalence, click here.

Myth: Dead rodents, birds and other wildlife swept up during the hay baling process are the main cause of botulism poisoning. Continue reading Combating equine botulism myths – Part four

Not just botulism: Preventing secondary problems

When caring for a horse that has equine botulism, secondary health problems also are a concern.

Secondary problems are those that may not necessarily be derived from the toxin, but can happen as a result of the effects of the illness, such as the animal becoming recumbent. Horses with equine botulism can encounter a range of these issues that can affect their recovery. Continue reading Not just botulism: Preventing secondary problems

Botulism podcast available

Horse HeadA new podcast is helping to answer questions about equine botulism.

It features Dr. Amy Johnson of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine, who has been a featured speaker on botulism several times on The Horse, along with Neogen veterinarians. In the latest podcast, Dr. Johnson discusses botulism types, prevalence and symptoms.

The podcast is available from The Horse and was produced by Horses in the Morning. You can find it here.

Ask the Vet Live to host botulism session

Want to learn more about equine botulism? Tune into The Horse.com’s Ask the Vet Live segment at 8 p.m. EST Thursday, Nov. 21 for information on the disease, from risk factors to signs and symptoms.

The segment will feature Neogen’s Director of Professional Services Dr. James Little and Dr. Allison Stewart, a professor of equine internal medicine at Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. To submit questions or to sign up for a reminder, please visit The Horse.com Ask the Vet page here. Continue reading Ask the Vet Live to host botulism session

Free continuing education course on botulism offered tomorrow

Veterinarians wishing to learn more about equine botulism and also earn continuing education (CE) credits have a chance to do so tomorrow.

Neogen is hosting a free equine botulism seminar that is worth two Registry of Approved Continuing Education (RACE)-approved CE credits tomorrow at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center in Harrisburg, Penn. Dinner will be provided. Attendees are asked to RSVP to either equinebotulism@neogen.com or by calling 800/525-2022. Continue reading Free continuing education course on botulism offered tomorrow

Combating equine botulism myths – Part three

Editor’s note: When it comes to equine botulism, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. In our latest series, we hope to tackle some common misconceptions about the disease. For our first post on a myth surrounding the geographic location of botulism, click here. For our second post on round bales, click here.

shutterstock_129837920Myth: I’ve never heard of equine botulism so it must not be that big of a deal.

Reality: Having more knowledge is never a bad thing.

When it comes to equine botulism, many people don’t know about it because it’s often not discussed, either for lack of awareness or the stigma attached to the disease (it’s a treacherous circle). Although it’s true that equine botulism isn’t one of the most common horse diseases, it is an extremely dangerous (and frequently fatal) and often preventable one. Therefore, the importance of knowing the risk for equine botulism is vital. Continue reading Combating equine botulism myths – Part three

Combating equine botulism myths – Part two

Haybales_smallEditor’s note: When it comes to equine botulism, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. In our latest series, we hope to tackle some common misconceptions about the disease. For our first post on a myth surrounding the geographic location of botulism, click here.

Myth: Horses only get botulism from round bales. Since I don’t feed from round bales, my horse is safe.

Reality: Although forage poisoning from round bales is probably one of  the most well known way horses can acquire the disease, it is far from the only way. Clostridium botulinum, the bacteria that produces the toxin that causes equine botulism, is an environmental bacterium, meaning it exists in the soil, on decaying vegetation and so on. Continue reading Combating equine botulism myths – Part two

Combating equine botulism myths – Part one

Horse FarmEditor’s note: When it comes to equine botulism, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. In our latest series, we hope to tackle some common misconceptions about the disease.

Myth: Equine botulism only happens in Kentucky.

Fact: The bacteria that causes botulism, Clostridium botulinum, is found in soil throughout the U.S. and around the world. While it is true that some areas, such as Kentucky and the eastern U.S., may see more cases than others it doesn’t mean that it can’t happen elsewhere. Continue reading Combating equine botulism myths – Part one