Monday links

What’s the latest in the fields of agriculture, food safety, animal science and toxicology? Check it out here.

Animal Science:

Five things swine producers should know — South Dakota State University Extension
Every year, thousands of young people across the country show off pigs at regional fairs. These experiences allow the public the rare opportunity to observe pig care and behavior, but in recent years, swine shows have been linked to influenza outbreaks in people. Here’s how to keep visitors safe.

Is early feeding favorable? Timing is everything — The Poultry Site
As the discussion around the welfare of newborn chicks and the optimum time to give them access to food and water grows, The Poultry Site digs deeper into the issue.

Food Safety:

Existential debate in U.S. food industry: What is meat? — Yahoo News
Can a hamburger or steak be labeled “meat” if it is plant-based? That question has sparked a debate about U.S. food labels as key cattle industry players have sought to crack down on marketing of proteins made from soy and other plant-based substances.

Human fatigue: A hidden food safety hazard — Food Safety Magazine
Human fatigue is a widespread and more troubling condition than most realize. In 2017, 2,010 adults were surveyed varying in industry, age, gender, ethnicity, and geographic regions. Survey results provide an insight to the various ways human fatigue may affect us and, more importantly, its prevalence both on and off the job.

Agriculture:

A revolution in farming — The Week
In some major cities, shipping containers are being used to contain hydroponic farming systems, some of which can produce between two and four tons of produce each year. While the concept might seem novel, container farms aren’t new.

Pesticides: What happens if we run out of options? — North Carolina State University
What happens when pests resist all forms of herbicides and pesticides? To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, North Carolina State University researchers argue, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale studies of promising approaches for slowing pest evolution.

Toxicology:

Women are taking MDMA wrapped in cheese and it’s called ‘brieing’ — Metro
There’s a new trend called “brieing” that involves groups of people — usually women — taking MDMA wrapped in cheese. Metro spoke to a 50-year-old businesswoman who said she regularly hosts MDMA-fueled dinner parties at her London home.

Offbeat:

The latest entries from the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards will cheer you up — Huffington Post
Now in its fourth year, the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards continue to bring viewers those goofy moments caught on camera that makes it seem like some animals are just like us. The entries for the 2018 competition are pouring in, from an embarrassed rabbit, “dancing” polar bears and a fur seal who is apparently having a really bad day with some penguins.

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